Monday, October 22, 2012

Sarcasm: The slow death of the conversation



The slow death of the conversation

 I just read on the net that the entries of some European restaurants are customers confiscate their cell phones while on the premises.
 According to the note, it is a stream of people seeking to regain the pleasure of eating, drinking and talking without the ring s tunes the interrupt, or that
 diners dart around like cats among the tables while talking loudly.
 The news made me envious of the good. Personally, I cannot remember what it is to have a conversation fluently, long and deep, drinking coffee or chocolate, but my partner left me with the word in the mouth, because his cell phone rings (such those that keep the headset and the microphone positions and no one knows if they speak or which is across the line!).
                                                                           

 Sometimes it's worse. Recently I was in a workshop that was dissolved just because three of the five people who were at the table began to address their urgent phone calls.
It was an indescribable chaos of conversations simultaneously.
                                                                           
 Thanks to the cell, the conversation is becoming a telegraphic outline not get anywhere. The phone has become a real intruder. It's getting worse.
Before, people used to find a corner to talk. Now lost modesty. Everyone screams for your phone, from the place in which he finds himself.
                                                                           

I do not deny the virtues of cellular communication. The speed, the gift of producing immediate location and of course, the integration has led to many sectors before outside phone.
But I worry that the more we communicate in the distance, the less we
 when we talk about.
                                                                           

 I'm impressed by the dependence we have on the phone. Professional license rather lose the mobile phone, as often, the SIM card works more than our own memory.
The cell rather than an instrument, it seems an extension of the body and almost no one can resist the feeling of abandonment and loneliness as they pass the hours and this does not sound. So perhaps some never go out. Neither film!
I've seen more than one answer to say quietly: "I'm in film, now I call you."
                                                                           
 It's something I try for more, I cannot understand. I can also feel a sense of helplessness that occurs in many people when they say hostesses on the plane is about to take off it's time to turn off the phones.
 I have also witnessed the concern that
 sounds loose when one of the most popular ringtones in reflex and all we got his pocket or purse, looking for the apparatus.
                                                                           

 But of all, the Blackberry deserve separate chapter. Alienated and autistic. So I have seen many of my colleagues, absorbed in chat on  this new invention. The scene is usually repeated.
                                                                           
 The Blackberry on the desktop. A beep that announces the arrival of a message, and the character I have in front of the phone is released.

Rarely can decline to respond immediately. I see typing a while, massaging the ball, and smile, then look at me and say, "What  we?
". But the conversation has been ruined. Do not know anyone who has Blackberry and not addicted to it.
                                                                           
 Someone told me that earlier in the morning when you wake up, your first instinct was to take a good coffee. Now his first act is to take everyday your unit and answer all your messages instantly.
 It is the tyranny of the instant, of simultaneity, of the dispersed of overdose
 information and connection to a virtual world that will end once ending the delicious pleasure of conversing with the other, face to face.
                                                                           
                                                                           
 ANONYMOUS

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